Down The Memory Lane: Remembering D.J. College

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Most of my favorite buildings in the city are from the British era. When I saw this photo it reminded me of a set of old photos of Karachi that I had received as a forwarded email. Above is the D.J. Government Science College in the year 2007 and below is the same building in 1893, soon after its construction was completed.

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Sindh Arts College [1893], uploaded by Zainub, originally taken by an unknown photographer, c.1800, from an album of 46 prints titled ‘Karachi Views’

Here’s a more detailed historical perspective on the building (text from Raja Islam’s stream and the forwarded email the above photo came with):

Inaugurated as Sind Arts College by Lord Reay, Governor of Bombay on 17th January, 1887 and renamed D.J. Science College (upon completion of the present structure), on 15th October, 1882 the building is located in the heart of old Karachi. Its foundation stone was laid on 19th November, 1887 by Lord Dufferin, Viceroy of India. It is named after the Sindhi philanthropist Diwan Dayaram Jethmal, who was its main benefactor. Two family members of Jethmal also contributed towards the cost of construction, the total of which is reported to have been Rs.186,514. The Government contributed Rs. 97,193 of this amount, the balance being raised through public donations.

It was designed by James Strachan and considered the architect’s greatest achievement. It is constructed in the neoclassical or Italian architectural style. A considerable amount of money was spent on the interior of the college; the floors comprised mosaic tiles imported from Belgium and the eight-foot wide main staircase was fitted with ornamental cast-iron work from McFarlane & Company of Glasgow. The college was understood to be part of a series of development projects embarked upon by the British in Karachi who aimed to utilize the city as a major port and main commercial center when they took over Sindh in the mid-19th century.

24 Comments so far

  1. IUnknown (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 6:31 pm

    such kinda buildings are a true tourist spot. We can earn a lot by preserving such buildings.

    I love old style buildings whether they are in karachi or in spain


  2. Imran (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 7:16 pm

    This is my alma mater; there are no words to describe the feeling of standing next to those columns or walking up its grand staircase…
    Thank you !


  3. Raja Islam (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 7:55 pm

    To visit or take snap of DJ college pay 25 Rs to the gard and you are free to visit after college timing.


  4. Raja Islam (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 8:00 pm

    I mean pay to Guard or chokidar.


  5. br0ke (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 9:03 pm

    a girl “remembering” D.J Science College FOR MEN….
    sounds gooood…..


  6. Zainub (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 9:18 pm

    Broke Mr or Ms,

    Expand your horizons, and try an understand the context in which things are said. I never said I went to the college! “Down The Memory Lane: Remembering…” is a tagline I often use while blogging, and I use it for this post because I posted two pictures of the same building over 100 years apart and accopanied it with text chornicling the history of the building. Heck, I never even said I had any memories of this place my self! So kindly refrain from putting words in my mouth, and re-read what’s been written in the context in which it has been written.


  7. Arsalaan Haleem (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 9:31 pm

    Am I the only one who find this a bit odd -“Inaugurated as Sind Arts College by Lord Reay, Governor of Bombay on 17th January, 1887 ….. foundation stone was laid on 19th November, 1887.

    How can the foundation stone be laid in the same year of the building’s inauguration?

    I checked DJ’s website and it doesn’t mention anything about its foundation stone being laid in 1887.

    Website: http://www.djsindhcollege.edu.pk/about_dj/history/history_m.htm


  8. Imran (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 9:31 pm

    LOVE YOU KARACHI : )

    Thanks for the wonderful extra bit of history of DJ Science College.

    Here are some pics from albums collected from here & there (all duly credited where ever possible).

    http://www.zorpia.com/group/karachi_scene/album/730398/Institutions_of_KARACHI

    http://www.zorpia.com/group/karachi_scene/album/735907/KARACHI_before_1900


  9. Balma (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 9:45 pm

    I thought girls were admitted to the BSc degree programs at DJ Sience College…at least some time ago.


  10. Jamal Shamsi (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 9:55 pm

    ZR Thats ma school,

    DJ Science College is my Alma meter – MY GOOD OLD GOLDEN Days –

    The Common room is now demolished where we use to play Table Tennis and destroy whatever we can :) before being caught, tried, suspended and re-instated, MY lIfe thread is attached to this place,

    IT is still CO-ED for the BSc’s –

    Intermediates are MEN thing only –


  11. khanabadosh (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 10:51 pm

    The labs were antiquated, most instruments dysfunctional, but the place had such an electric atmosphere. God … it brings back a rush of memories.

    Thanks, Zainub, for rekindling those cherished memories …


  12. br0ke (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 11:16 pm

    its Mr. br0ke but u can call me scotty….
    i apologise for my lack of sensitivity…..
    oh and thanks for posting my college’s photographs….
    brings back them fond memories of loooong hours of detention…..


  13. khanabadosh (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 11:34 pm

    @Broke:
    “… D.J Science College FOR MEN …”?

    When did that happen? Wasn’t so in my day.


  14. imran (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 11:53 pm

    Request to do a post on growing “Sheesha” culture in Karachi.

    Can any Author do some research and give us info about this new growing culture in karachi.Feel free to take positive or negative veiw on it.

    Thanks


  15. Jamal Shamsi (unregistered) on November 13th, 2007 @ 11:59 pm

    Dec 31 2007 – All sheesha bars / cafes will seize to exit in UAE –

    Public usage of Sheesha will be fined to tune of dirham 1000 –

    and here we are developing sheesha culture,

    — Ham kiss gali ja rahay hain… !!


  16. Zainub (unregistered) on November 14th, 2007 @ 12:27 am

    On topics folks, on topic. Keep it on topic.

    Imran,

    Just re-read, you’re right. The dates seem messed up, I’ll confirm and correct them ASAP. Thanks for pointing that out.


  17. Imran (unregistered) on November 14th, 2007 @ 1:29 am

    Imran,

    that idea about “sheesha” is interesting.

    Though prohibiting/debate on smoking should be on a higher priority than sheesha, as its more prevalent, dont you think?

    NB: I dont smoke cancer-sticks or sheesha :)


  18. imran (unregistered) on November 14th, 2007 @ 1:48 am

    @Imran,
    The reaon I asked for post about “sheesha” is that it is more dangerous than smoking because sheesha has not been officially declared prohibited(or Napasandeeda act)for minors inclduing girls/boys in our culture and has been looked at as a cool thing specially in burger class.
    This growing culture of having Sheesha bar will have a great negative impact on a young generations. I was in Karachi few months ago and went to one of the sheesh place (forgot the name) and was shocked to see young girls/boys having fun with Sheesha in the presence of thier elder family members (at least youngsters hide smoking from their elders)
    Smoking sheesha or cigerates both are bad for health but this grwoing culture is ruining our social values where we are even affraid to accept that we smoke infront of our elder relatives.


  19. IUnknown (unregistered) on November 14th, 2007 @ 11:16 am

    our all nation is getting “charsi” one way or the other


  20. Jamal Shamsi (unregistered) on November 14th, 2007 @ 2:08 pm

    dil chah raha hai to add more on sheesha

    – but that will be diversion from Topic which is my sweet dearest school, :) it is a lovely sight after sunset, mesmerizing structure, enchanting with echos of past not preserved but only in memory


  21. Amyn (unregistered) on November 15th, 2007 @ 9:43 am

    Zainub, if you really liked DJ’s building for it’s architecture and old structure, then I would higly recommend you to visit BVS Parsi High School. It was my school and I am proud of it. A visit will tell you itself as the building speaks for it’s self


  22. zakir (unregistered) on November 15th, 2007 @ 10:33 am

    I could still remember the early days of 1991-1992 when I witnessed the first shooting between APMSO and Jamiat and the class teacher asked us to hide under the benches.IT WAS SCARY !!!!!!! also I could remember our URDU teacher Sir Kamal Kibriya who slapped an APMSO student for misbehaving.But all n all I great architecture.Thanks to th BRITISHERS !!!!!!!!!!


  23. zakir (unregistered) on November 15th, 2007 @ 10:34 am

    I could still remember the early days of 1991-1992 when I witnessed the first shooting between APMSO and Jamiat and the class teacher asked us to hide under the benches.IT WAS SCARY !!!!!!! also I could remember our URDU teacher Sir Kamal Kibriya who slapped an APMSO student for misbehaving.But all n all I great architecture.Thanks to th BRITISHERS !!!!!!!!!!


  24. nadia (unregistered) on November 17th, 2007 @ 6:01 pm

    nadia@yahoo.com
    03333296457



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