Polio Free Pakistan

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So did the Polio campaign representative showed up at your doorstep??

I donĂ­t even remember what year it was when Pakistan started war against polio, in collaboration with UNICEF, an attempt to make Pakistan Polio free country. Was it 1998? In those early years I was a volunteer myself on some camps. Its been quite sometime and we are still in the middle of war. Last year Pakistan had the highest number of polio cases in the world… is this a step ahead?

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2 Comments so far

  1. misbah munir (unregistered) on November 24th, 2005 @ 8:26 pm

    In Memory Of Another Young Martyr: How Many More?

    Dr. Yusra Khalil was our colleague: she was someone most of us had come to know, befriend and respect for the five years we spent together at Dow Medical College. She graduated with the rest of the Class of 2005 and respectfully earned her right to be honored Doctor. She got married after her bachelors. Her House Job at the Civil Hospital Karachi (CHK) started this August and she was an enthusiastic doctor working her way through General & E.N.T. Surgery. It seemed everything was great in her life.

    This was until a few days back. That is when she fell sick. Eventually, so sick that her family had to take her to the Aga Khan University Hospital (AKU). The family spent the night in the AKU emergency room: helpless. The doctors there told her family that Yusra was suspected of having a “Viral Hemorrhagic Fever”, a rare but life-threatening infection that can kill as many as three-fourths of those who catch it. Because of how infectious her condition was, nobody was eager to manage her intensively. Our colleague slipped into a coma, in desperate need of a Ventilator. What’s utterly disgusting is the fact that the AKU, CHK and every other place in the city the family contacted refused to provide a Ventilator to a patient with Viral Hemorrhagic Fever. Its only hours later that the AKU decided to provide her the service. By then it was six hours too late: she had been deprived of oxygen for too long! On Sunday night, Yusra passed away. Her family was devastated. We were in shock.

    How did the young martyr catch the infection that took her life, her dreams, her everything? Nobody knows for sure. The CHK has been admitting many undiagnosed cases with vague flu-like symptoms (like our colleague’s) for the past few days. There is every possibility that she could have been exposed while at work. What’s pitiful is the fact that the doctors at the CHK work in an environment that puts them at highest risk for acquiring all kinds of serious infections; infections that are lying open in our wards waiting for the next sufferer to come into contact. Worse is the harsh reality that the administration of the CHK has not done anything to change the scenario. Even worse is the fact that when another resident died of similar circumstances a month ago, the CHK authorities only covered it up and supposedly issued a circular which none of the wards in the hospital displayed for plain view, keeping the doctors at risk in the dark. In circumstances that could have been prevented, isn’t it high time to change things?

    A meeting was held on Monday (November 21) between the House Officers and the Medical Superintendent of the Civil Hospital, Karachi (CHK) at the Office of the Medical Superintendent, CHK. It was a morning filled with emotions, anger & a feeling of great loss. The House Officers put forward the following demands in the meeting:

    1. That an immediate Isolation Facility be established in CHK.

    2. That every House Officer and Doctor be provided with:

    a. Anti-viral treatment [Prophylaxis] for the condition suspected to be the Viral Hemorrhagic Fever.

    b. Surgical and Examination gloves for routine use with ready access to Post-exposure preventive measures.

    c. A guarantee that they will not required to do work that is the responsibility of nurses and paramedics [e.g.: drawing blood, setting up drips and cannulas].

    d. Financial / loss compensations for those affected by the condition.

    3. That screening for Hepatitis B & C viruses be made mandatory for every patient admitted to the CHK.

    4. That somebody should claim responsibility for this event & for any future consequences of mismanagement on the administration’s behalf; And that he be held accountable.

    The House Officers of the CHK will not work to the day these demands are brought into effect.

    What we may achieve might prevent another work-related incident, and, maybe, another death. It is, however, too late for our Yusra: a beloved daughter, a beloved sister, a beloved wife and a beloved colleague.

    House Officers
    Civil Hospital, Karachi.


  2. misbah munir (unregistered) on November 24th, 2005 @ 8:27 pm

    i had to post it somehow….and the only way was to post it as a comment to most appropriate blog.
    plz read on.

    In Memory Of Another Young Martyr: How Many More?

    Dr. Yusra Khalil was our colleague: she was someone most of us had come to know, befriend and respect for the five years we spent together at Dow Medical College. She graduated with the rest of the Class of 2005 and respectfully earned her right to be honored Doctor. She got married after her bachelors. Her House Job at the Civil Hospital Karachi (CHK) started this August and she was an enthusiastic doctor working her way through General & E.N.T. Surgery. It seemed everything was great in her life.

    This was until a few days back. That is when she fell sick. Eventually, so sick that her family had to take her to the Aga Khan University Hospital (AKU). The family spent the night in the AKU emergency room: helpless. The doctors there told her family that Yusra was suspected of having a “Viral Hemorrhagic Fever”, a rare but life-threatening infection that can kill as many as three-fourths of those who catch it. Because of how infectious her condition was, nobody was eager to manage her intensively. Our colleague slipped into a coma, in desperate need of a Ventilator. What’s utterly disgusting is the fact that the AKU, CHK and every other place in the city the family contacted refused to provide a Ventilator to a patient with Viral Hemorrhagic Fever. Its only hours later that the AKU decided to provide her the service. By then it was six hours too late: she had been deprived of oxygen for too long! On Sunday night, Yusra passed away. Her family was devastated. We were in shock.

    How did the young martyr catch the infection that took her life, her dreams, her everything? Nobody knows for sure. The CHK has been admitting many undiagnosed cases with vague flu-like symptoms (like our colleague’s) for the past few days. There is every possibility that she could have been exposed while at work. What’s pitiful is the fact that the doctors at the CHK work in an environment that puts them at highest risk for acquiring all kinds of serious infections; infections that are lying open in our wards waiting for the next sufferer to come into contact. Worse is the harsh reality that the administration of the CHK has not done anything to change the scenario. Even worse is the fact that when another resident died of similar circumstances a month ago, the CHK authorities only covered it up and supposedly issued a circular which none of the wards in the hospital displayed for plain view, keeping the doctors at risk in the dark. In circumstances that could have been prevented, isn’t it high time to change things?

    A meeting was held on Monday (November 21) between the House Officers and the Medical Superintendent of the Civil Hospital, Karachi (CHK) at the Office of the Medical Superintendent, CHK. It was a morning filled with emotions, anger & a feeling of great loss. The House Officers put forward the following demands in the meeting:

    1. That an immediate Isolation Facility be established in CHK.

    2. That every House Officer and Doctor be provided with:

    a. Anti-viral treatment [Prophylaxis] for the condition suspected to be the Viral Hemorrhagic Fever.

    b. Surgical and Examination gloves for routine use with ready access to Post-exposure preventive measures.

    c. A guarantee that they will not required to do work that is the responsibility of nurses and paramedics [e.g.: drawing blood, setting up drips and cannulas].

    d. Financial / loss compensations for those affected by the condition.

    3. That screening for Hepatitis B & C viruses be made mandatory for every patient admitted to the CHK.

    4. That somebody should claim responsibility for this event & for any future consequences of mismanagement on the administration’s behalf; And that he be held accountable.

    The House Officers of the CHK will not work to the day these demands are brought into effect.

    What we may achieve might prevent another work-related incident, and, maybe, another death. It is, however, too late for our Yusra: a beloved daughter, a beloved sister, a beloved wife and a beloved colleague.

    House Officers
    Civil Hospital, Karachi.



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