Hum sharminda hojaate hain – Sindh Police

So i’m standing at my favourite eat out place, Karachi Broast, waiting for my order.. when a police-wala comes in.

(Conversation has been slightly modified, but the theme is the same)
Cop to Shop Owner: are you the Shop Owner here
Shop Owner: yes……..
Cop: just coming around to inform you that we wont be around for an hour….
Shop Owner (returning back to his work): okay……… cya
Cop: Yea, you see, we’re supposed to stay here during our full shift.. but we have to eat too…
Shop Owner (Still not looking up): okay.. please go have ur dinner
Cop: Yea, the thing is… our DSP talked with your association manager and he complained about us not being here. So they setup a deal for some of the shops here to supply meals for us, and we’ll be on duty the whole time……
Shop Owner: (Totally ignoring him…): hhhhmmmmm….
Cop: ….. but whenever we come to any of the shop, they tell us its not their turn, or to goto another shop. Humey buhut sharmindagi hote hai aise maangney mein….
Shop Owner: (wishing he was somewhere else..): umm hmmmmm…..
Cop: So we’re just telling you guys we wont be around for an hour. We hope nothing will happen during that time.. but if khuda-na-khasta it does, you know we wont be around to do much.
Shop Owner: mmm.. okay…. cya
Cop: Yea.. but if we get to have dinner from here, we’ll be around to make sure nothing happens. And do our duty to the fullest.
Shop Owner: (almost visibly agitated by now): ummm. hmmmm…………
Cop: (sensing nothing can be gotten here): Any idea where would your association manager be right now?

thats when someone came and took him along to see the Association manager. I was just standing there, looking and getting amused all the time.

40 Comments so far

  1. Captain's Log (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 6:09 pm

    At least that cop has lil self esteem, he could have asked directly. Do you expect them to pay for their lunches/dinner while on duty in 5000 Rs job. Why army people have mess where they could go and eat for free and police does not have.

    Any how I did not find that amusning, it was embarassing that how do we treat cops in Khi. Even in US, cops get free food in most places. I personally know that as my roommate used to own Seven-Eleven super store and cops always used to have free drinks/coffees. No one wants to charge them even if they want to pay.


  2. MB (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 6:20 pm

    CL is right. At least they were ashamed enough to hide the motive. Others in society are bagairat enough to directly ask. A taxation person came few days back to our office and my admin in charge told me he was bagairat enough to bluntly ask for bribe, straight away from the start of conversation, without wasting any time ( as he had similar other appointments).

    And same is the case everywhere. It’s just the matter of changing tactics. And since the Army is eating the whole country, they don’t need to be “sharminda” like police cops. They get it officially. The same 5000 rupee cop will get a bullet as reward if he tried to stop anyone doing a “daaka” or “lootmaar”. Will the same association manager come and pay few lacks to his family. You know the answer.


  3. Mad_Racer.... (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 7:51 pm

    LOLZ

    the topic should’ve been Humey buhut BHOOK lagi hai apnay paisoo say khatay howay sharam aati hai…… :D


  4. zahra (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 8:13 pm

    thats so horrible of the shop owner, the whole point is that if someone needs somehting you dont embarass them by making them spell it out to the last letter. what are you daft?

    how about treating people the way you’d like others to treat you…??


  5. Kaash (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 8:31 pm

    “Even in US, cops get free food in most places. I personally know that as my roommate used to own Seven-Eleven super store and cops always used to have free drinks/coffees.”
    I disagree…I always see them paying for their food while standing in line but it is true that they get complimentary drinks at convinient stores. Plus they don’t stoop that low by scavanging food from the vendors…it does’nt mean they are not corrupt…they do rishwut khori on higher levels.
    peace
    Kaash


  6. Yahya (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 9:01 pm

    Everyone starts blaming the people; public, shops keeper, police. The problem is government! If they don’t let billions stolen away and pay the police some real wages police wouldn’t have to worry about begging. This is just pathetic satiation that government has placed everyone in including the cops.


  7. Kashif (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 9:20 pm

    They already ate half of the country 25 years back and now gobbling up the remains.


  8. ash (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 9:39 pm

    You have to be really hard up to ask someone for food. Ofcourse police wallahs dont have much money we all know that. Maybe the shop keeper cant afford to feed them everyday either. There can be no valid comparison to american police or american shop keepers because they are both 100 times richer.


  9. kidal (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 9:58 pm

    It’s sad. Most people instinctively do not like to ask or beg. When they do, it is usually for a reason.

    While our police force may be corrupt and inept, they are not to blame entirely. Their salaries are pathetic and they receive no respect from the people.

    While some of you might disagree, I think the conversation showed two dignified men. The police officer was asking in the most courteous, embarrassed manner. The shop owner was declinig in the most indirect, polite manner.


  10. Sufi (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 10:17 pm

    Mansoor … Sweet :D


  11. K G (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 10:18 pm

    Human respect is more important then anything,be it a free lunch or anything else .


  12. K G (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 10:22 pm

    *THAN*


  13. Yahya (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 10:22 pm

    Ok, here is how it works…

    Government takes tax from shopkeepers…government pays some of it to police. Shopkeepers have already paid their due. Police should, in principle, already have money for lunch. But if they don’t then who is to blame? Hint: Not shopkeeper.


  14. Sufi (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 10:40 pm

    Yahya, are you so sure that shopkeepers have already paid they taxes?


  15. Arsalaan Haleem (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 10:54 pm

    Truly Sad :-(


  16. Haseeb A (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 11:07 pm

    Upar say neechay tak, Pura ka pura system kharab hay….
    This country needs a revolution…
    People on the streets…… Educated People…..
    This country needs a system….

    Comeon people. RISE, RISE


  17. Haseeb A (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 11:17 pm

    Upar say neechay tak, Pura ka pura system kharab hay….
    This country needs a revolution…
    People on the streets…… Educated People…..
    This country needs a system….

    Comeon people. RISE, RISE


  18. turab (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 11:25 pm

    Despite all the corruption and what not, I think this police wala was very polite and not rude…

    Moreover, I think the general public is always very rude to the Police. They are normal human beings with low paying jobs which require them to do more.

    Comon saying… agar humari police sahi hojaye to saara maashra sahi hojaye!


  19. Ramla A. (unregistered) on November 30th, 2006 @ 11:39 pm

    Once upon a time there was one of those pillion riding bans in the city in the mid-90’s. There was blood in the streets, and one could hear the sound of firing and murder everywhere.

    My brother hopped on his friend’s bike to a nearby photostat shop, as they decided to get a handful of stuff copied. A few minutes later, a police mobile brought them to our home.

    In short, they wanted money. I was surprised to see a well-dressed, be-sunglassed policewala politely ask for money. We had two notes of 50 ready, but we asked them why? He said, “Madam, the government has asked us to continually patrol the streets, looking out for miscreants. If we are found parked or resting, we can be reported. However, we haven’t been rationed enough patrol to do all the miles. How do they expect us to fulfill the condition?”

    That single conversation has always made me think twice before blaming the policewala all the time, arbitrarily.

    *** I feel uncomfortable with a person having to ask for food like this, when they aren’t clearly flexing their “I am a policewala” muscle either – but just standing in that no-man’s-land where they aren’t earning enough to buy a burger nor are unemployed beggars to earn mercy. Disturbing!


  20. ash (unregistered) on December 1st, 2006 @ 3:31 am

    When i was in college doing NCC training one of the subjects was “proper shoe care”. Me and my friends were baking in the sun looking disinterested and talking to each other. Our instructor started yelling at us saying you only think this is unimportant because you have more than two pairs of shoes. I looked at the shoes he was wearing….I have never felt so bad.

    We are all frustrated from time to time by the lack of infrastructure, but please remember the people on the others side, police, army etc are just human. They are generally way underpaid in our country.


  21. ash (unregistered) on December 1st, 2006 @ 3:34 am

    When i was in college doing NCC training one of the subjects was “proper shoe care”. Me and my friends were baking in the sun looking disinterested and talking to each other. Our instructor started yelling at us saying you only think this is unimportant because you have more than two pairs of shoes. I looked at the shoes he was wearing….I have never felt so bad.
    We are all frustrated from time to time by the lack of infrastructure, but please remember the people on the others side, police, army etc are just human. They are generally way underpaid in our country.


  22. UZi (unregistered) on December 1st, 2006 @ 5:34 am

    Herr zulm ka ek jawaab
    INQUILAAB INQUILAAB!

    :P


  23. Yahya (unregistered) on December 1st, 2006 @ 6:02 am

    Uzi, we are waiting for you to lead us. :)

    Say when and where.


  24. Rabia (unregistered) on December 1st, 2006 @ 9:32 am

    diappointing situation ..


  25. striker (unregistered) on December 1st, 2006 @ 10:15 am

    cops get free dirnks in us coz it cost almost no money, i work at a gas station and the owner told me to give them free drinks but not the other stuff


  26. mansoor (unregistered) on December 1st, 2006 @ 10:22 am

    atleast kidal got the gist of the situation… even though the situation was amazing from a bystander point of view, it did demonstrate two dignified men.


  27. Yahya (unregistered) on December 1st, 2006 @ 6:10 pm

    “it did demonstrate two dignified men”

    …in a chronically undignified system. Hope their dignity lasts long.


  28. UZi (unregistered) on December 2nd, 2006 @ 1:22 am

    @ Yahya :: Never initiate war until and unless you are absolutely sure that you have the resources to outdo your enemy — Mao

    Viva la Revolucion (but in a while)! :P


  29. UZi (unregistered) on December 2nd, 2006 @ 1:22 am

    @ Yahya :: Never initiate war until and unless you are absolutely sure that you have the resources to outdo your enemy — Mao

    Viva la Revolucion (but in a while)! :P


  30. UZi (unregistered) on December 2nd, 2006 @ 1:23 am

    @ Yahya :: Never initiate war until and unless you are absolutely sure that you have the resources to outdo your enemy — Mao

    Viva la Revolucion (but in a while)! :P


  31. UZi (unregistered) on December 2nd, 2006 @ 1:26 am

    oh jeez @ flood! sowie, my internet’s messed up! :P


  32. ash (unregistered) on December 2nd, 2006 @ 3:57 am

    The problem is in Pakistan you have to fight 10,000 different enemies. Who ever has that many resources?


  33. d0ct0r (unregistered) on December 2nd, 2006 @ 10:39 pm

    back in ramzan we had governor visiting one of our neighbor for iftar party … nearly 250 police and rangers man were posted in the immediate vicinity at the time of iftar nobody cared about these security man and governor must be enjoying his ifftar and these men were cursing him,they were not even offered glass of water… we took care of about a dozen cops posted in front of our house and gave them iftari for breaking their fast..

    don’t these people in power(Dictator, PM ,Governor,CM, ministers and other highups) think about their subordinates? they just take it all for granted..

    i think we should reform our police , educated people should be recruited and we should respect them and give them incentives like its the case all over the world… that’ll end the bribe culture… try making a budget with 5000 for a family of 5-6 (4 school going kids)


  34. fahad (unregistered) on December 4th, 2006 @ 9:05 pm

    this conversation brought tears to my eyes. can’t explain my fealings… poor cop! what else can i say… i think the UNION must establish a jointly contributed meal program for them… but then why the cops only??? why not the little man sitting by the road, waving his hand in the air, asking for “aik Rupiya” (one rupee) !!!


  35. Iftikhar Ajmal Bhopal (unregistered) on December 5th, 2006 @ 7:59 pm

    Policeman in our coutry is paid too little to do justice to the type and amount of duties they are asked to perform and then they are pushed around. Everybody imagines them to be their personal servant. If Policemen are reasonably paid and given due respect comensurate with their duty, many will like to live within their means.


  36. Atonement (unregistered) on December 5th, 2006 @ 10:36 pm

    Ash’s account has shaken me up.

    A very apparantly insignificant incident a few years ago first made me *appreciate* the life of a police-wala. I had to take a bus when my car broke down on way to an interview. I got off at the wrong place, clueless about the routes, and asked a traffic police guy about a certain place next to a MacDonalds.

    The policewala was rather helpful, but didn’t quite get where I wanted to go to. I then said, “Oh that place is next to McD.”
    He said, “Oh that restaurant where you eat?”
    I said, “yes, next to McD.”
    His eyes got momentarily fazed and he asked, “The place where you get burgers?”
    I asked, “Yes, How do I reach street _____?”
    He replied, “What do you get to eat there?”

    And that’s when it really *hit* me, that this man had never seen the inside of the place that I was referring to in such an off-handed manner, and that his mind was completely gone, he was completely distracted.

    I just thought for the FIRST TIME how does it feel like to always watch McD but never be able to go in there like all families do.

    When the guy got out of his trance, perhaps because my face had registered such shock, he caught me a cab and directed me to my destination.

    I can never forget his expressions – his LONGING – for a McD meal.


  37. mansoor (unregistered) on December 6th, 2006 @ 9:30 am

    atonement: ouch man! that hurts :(


  38. ash (unregistered) on December 8th, 2006 @ 7:06 am

    hey atonement, thanks for posting. We all know we are surrounded by poverty but we forget that the police, army, etc men that we love to blame actually have to live it out and still somehow perform their duties.


  39. Captain's Log (unregistered) on December 8th, 2006 @ 8:20 am

    Ask , please exclude Punjab’s Army, I was just reading newspaper and they get waiver of 87% on their electricity bills.


  40. ash (unregistered) on December 8th, 2006 @ 12:05 pm

    I am sure they are millionaires with all that saved electricity money. My instructor who was wearing those cruddy falling apart shoes WAS punjabi. And I am not punjabi so no ethnic bias here.

    Every other army in the world gives their soldiers kick backs, we offer them free electricity? what a travesty.



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