P@SHA-Intel Workshop on Opportunities in Non-Traditional IT areas

On Tuesday April 8, from 2 pm to 5 pm, Vickram Crishna conducts a discourse, at the Mahnoor Room, Karachi PC, about the world of fascinating opportunities that have opened up in applying IT and communications technologies inclusively. Addressing the needs of communities currently less well served, such as rural dwellers, urban persons who do not use computers, and persons for whom computers are unaccessible primarily because of physical design issues. Accessing business needs in such circumstances can be rewarding in many ways – both commercial and non-commercial.

TOPIC: INTELLIGENT CHOICES: Opportunities in Non-Traditional IT areas

DATE: Tuesday, April 8 2008
TIME: 2:00 – 5:00 pm
VENUE: Mahnoor Room, Pearl Continental Hotel, Karachi
REGISTRATION IS FREE: Register at secretariat@pasha.org.pk

Read more details on P@SHA blog

5 Comments so far

  1. Adnan Siddiqi (adnansiddiqi) on April 6th, 2008 @ 7:05 pm


    and communications technologies inclusively. Addressing the needs of communities currently less well served, such as rural dwellers, urban persons who do not use computers, and persons for whom computers are unaccessible primarily because of physical design issues.

    Fine we don’t have computers for rural areas neither it seems possible as it requires lots of investment while OLPC doesn’t seem goin fine either. Thing is, why do we rely on something which they don’t have and try to utilize medium which 80% Pakistanis have been using these days efficiently? I am talking about mobile gadgets and wireless networks. Yester eve I got chance to watch "The world Debate" on BCC in which Google’s co-founfer Sergey Brin also participated along with some journalist from Uganda and Queen of Jordan. The co-founder correctly said that in near future mobile networks will play important role to bridge the gap between a "Shahri Babu" and "Gunwar Dehati" since both person will be getting same piece of information and there will be no discrimination. The journalist told that in Africa more people are getting latest news on mobile than PCs since mobile is most accessible and cheap medium for them.

    I don’t know how much it’s possible in Pakistan but I know this is the only future in IT world. Atleast my investment will be in this sector.

    Good post doc. Hope this workshop will be covered more in future threads.


  2. Adnan Siddiqi (adnansiddiqi) on April 6th, 2008 @ 8:44 pm

    With reference to original post and my rant, Intel plans to introduce MIDs


  3. Vic (v1ck) on April 7th, 2008 @ 12:40 pm

    Thanks, Adnan. I hope you will make it tomorrow – and participate!

    Ummmm… rereading the post P@SHA put up in their newspage, which is repeated here at metblogs, I am not sure why you feel the need to ‘rant’, as I for one do agree with you. With some reservations of course, which we can go over tomorrow, but in case you can’t make it, let me spell it out here.

    Mobile gadgets are today considered to fall narrowly in the area of GSM and CDMA hand-phones, both of which depend entirely on centralised service providers for connectivity. Mostly, all over the world, these service providers price their data services (and in the case of GSM, these data services are an afterthought) at humungously unaffordable rates (except for an elite minority), doubtless influenced by the killing they make on their SMS services.

    SMS is built into GSM, and should continue to be free, as it was in the 90s, since GSM won’t work at all without the ‘handshaking’ in which SMS takes place. That it isn’t free simply lays bare the ugly thinking that pervades such businesses, making unholy profits out of the critical microdata exchanges (1 kB at a time) that poor people could benefit from, in e-governance, micro-cash transfers, telemedicine, agricultural consulting and dozens more.

    For data services, EDGE and GPRS are currently offered nearly everywhere that GSM works, which is nearly everywhere, and 3G is supposed to be the proverbial pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. CDMA has data connectivity built in from the start, but has yet to be a serious competitor to GSM except in limited markets. DoCoMo is available in Japan, and hardly anywhere else. The costs of pretty much all of these data services is substantially (exponentially!) higher than copper- or fiber-based bandwidth, thus limiting the number of users who can afford to use them. Certainly, in many places around the world, it is hard to imagine a starving or disease-wracked family gratefully grabbing the gold-plated straws of SMS and mobile data services, as currently offered, no matter what Sergey Brin and the Queen of Jordan think.

    As for pure data wireless networks, this will be covered in as much detail as I can in the time I have. Rest assured, I am as enthusiastic as you about the immense future this technology affords.


  4. Adnan Siddiqi (adnansiddiqi) on April 8th, 2008 @ 12:39 am

    @Vic: thanks.

    you can contact me anytime off the site. You can get my contact via my blog(kadnan.com/blog)


  5. Adnan Siddiqi (adnansiddiqi) on April 8th, 2008 @ 12:41 am

    Oh BTW, you are free to comment here further. Will happy to read your reservations.

    One of the reservation(obstacle) is street crime and atleast this technology can’t be used freely in Karachi.



Terms of use | Privacy Policy | Content: Creative Commons | Site and Design © 2009 | Metroblogging ® and Metblogs ® are registered trademarks of Bode Media, Inc.